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Trang chủ » Man who placed feet on Pelosi’s desk during Jan. 6th riot receives 4.5-year prison sentence.

Man who placed feet on Pelosi’s desk during Jan. 6th riot receives 4.5-year prison sentence.

Jan. 6 rioter who put his feet on desk in Pelosi office sentenced to 4.5 years in prison

Jan. 6 rioter who put his feet on desk in Pelosi office sentenced to 4.5 years in prison

Jan. 6 Capitol Rioter Who Put Feet on Pelosi’s Desk Sentenced to 54 Months in Prison

Richard “Bigo” Barnett, the Arkansas man who was photographed with his feet on a desk in then-Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s office during the Jan. 6 Capitol riot, has been sentenced to 54 months in prison. Federal prosecutors had requested more than seven years, citing Barnett’s actions before, during, and after the riot. Barnett’s lawyers argued for no more than six months, saying the 63-year-old retired firefighter and bull rider had come to DC to peacefully protest and was caught up in events that were out of his control.

Barnett was convicted in January on eight charges related to the riot, including theft of government property and entering and remaining in a restricted building or grounds with a deadly or dangerous weapon. He armed himself with a ten-pound steel pole and a stun device. Barnett also left a sexist note for Pelosi that read, “Nancy, Bigo was here.”

During his trial, Barnett expressed remorse for his actions, but has since maintained he was a victim of “political persecution.” Prosecutors argued that Barnett had come to DC looking for a fight and had prepared for violence. They say his actions after the riot show that he is without remorse and would engage in similar conduct again.

FAQs:

Q: What was Richard Barnett sentenced for?
A: Barnett was sentenced to 54 months in prison for his actions during the Jan. 6 Capitol riot, including theft of government property and entering and remaining in a restricted building or grounds with a deadly or dangerous weapon.

Q: What did Barnett do during the riot?
A: Barnett armed himself with a ten-pound steel pole and a stun device and entered Pelosi’s office, where he put his feet on her desk and left a sexist note. He also took an envelope and later displayed it for cameras outside the Capitol.

Q: Did Barnett express remorse for his actions?
A: Yes, during his trial, Barnett expressed remorse for his actions, but he has since maintained he was a victim of “political persecution.”

Q: What have prosecutors said about Barnett’s actions after the riot?
A: Prosecutors say Barnett’s actions after the riot, including selling autographed pictures of himself in Pelosi’s office and tweeting “disinformation” and conspiracy theories about the Jan. 6 attack, show that he is without remorse and would engage in similar conduct again.

Jan. 6 rioter who put his feet on desk in Pelosi office sentenced to 4.5 years in prison
Jan. 6 rioter who put his feet on desk in Pelosi office sentenced to 4.5 years in prison

Man who put his feet on Pelosi’s desk during Jan. 6 riot receives 4.5-year prison sentence

Richard “Bigo” Barnett, the Arkansas man who became a widely known symbol of the January 6 riot at the U.S. Capitol, was sentenced to four and a half years in prison on Wednesday. Barnett was photographed with his feet on a desk in then-Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s office during the riot, and prosecutors argued that he should serve more than seven years in prison for his actions before, during, and after the attack. Barnett’s lawyers argued that he should not receive more than six months behind bars, and told the court that he was a retired firefighter and bull rider who had come to Washington, D.C., for his first-ever protest. The U.S. District Court Judge Christopher Cooper disagreed, citing the severity of Barnett’s crimes and sentencing him to 54 months in prison.

Barnett faced eight charges stemming from the Capitol attack, including theft of government property and entering and remaining in a restricted building or grounds with a deadly or dangerous weapon. In addition to the stun device, Barnett armed himself with a ten-pound steel pole. Prosecutors noted that Barnett took an envelope from Pelosi’s office before leaving, which he later displayed for cameras outside the Capitol. He also acknowledged leaving what he later called a “nasty note” for Pelosi, which read, “Nancy, Bigo was here,” and ended with a sexist expletive.

Barnett expressed remorse for his actions when he took the witness stand in his own defense, telling the court that he shouldn’t have put his feet on the desk and admitting that he had made a mistake. However, after being convicted, he maintained that he was the victim of “political persecution” and that the jury that convicted him was “not a jury of my peers.” Prosecutors pushed back on his claims and stated that the evidence showed that Barnett had come to Washington, D.C., looking for a fight and had prepared for violence by arming himself with a stun device and steel pole.

After his arrest, Barnett sought to profit from his notoriety and criminal conduct, prosecutors said, including by selling autographed pictures of himself in Pelosi’s office. They added that he has continued to tweet “disinformation” and conspiracy theories about the January 6 attack since his conviction, showing that “he is without remorse and would readily engage in similar conduct in the future.”

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